Nano Bugle

A window into applied science supported by INL

New Electrode for Lithium-Ion Batteries

Coaxial manganese oxide/carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays deposited inside porous alumina templates were used as cathodes in a lithium battery. Source: Nano Letters

Coaxial manganese oxide/carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays deposited inside porous alumina templates were used as cathodes in a lithium battery. Source: Nano Letters

We currently use a large number of electronic devices powered by rechargeable batteries such as laptops, mobile phones, cameras and video game consoles, some of the toys of our children, for example. In addition to these uses we can imagine many others who would become important if there is a large battery storage capacity, such as its use to fuel vehicles.

All this leads to the development of technologies related to the efficient storage of electricity is one of the highest demands of our society.

Researchers from la Rice University have developed a technology that, according to the authors, could substantially increase the capacity and number of charge/discharge of the lithium-ion batteries.

The research team led by M. Pulicket Ajay, created hybrid carbon nanotube arrays as metal oxide electrode material. In combining technology developed for the realization of carbon nanotube electrodes, which is a great conductor of electricity and manganese oxide, which has a large capacity. Although this combination was already used to manufacture electrodes, the novelty of this work is available in the form of used coaxial cable. In this case, nanotubes are punishable as a coaxial cable consisting of a high conductor nanotube core and a manganese oxide shell.

According to the authors, this technology could lead to the development of small and flexible batteries.

The article appears in the digital version of the American Chemical Society’s Nano Letters.

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February 18, 2009 - Posted by | Nano News

1 Comment »

  1. Thank.

    Comment by electronic | July 13, 2009 | Reply


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