Nano Bugle

A window into applied science supported by INL

Invisibility shields one step closer with new metamaterials that bend light backwards

Scientists at the University of California, Berkeley, have for the first time engineered 3-D materials that can reverse the natural direction of visible and near-infrared light, a development that could help form the basis for higher resolution optical imaging, nanocircuits for high-powered computers, and, to the delight of science-fiction and fantasy buffs, cloaking devices that could render objects invisible to the human eye.

Two breakthroughs in the development of metamaterials – composite materials with extraordinary capabilities to bend electromagnetic waves – are reported separately this week in the Aug. 13 advanced online issue of Nature, and in the Aug. 15 issue of Science.

You can read more about this amazing scientific advance here

 

 

Above is a schematic of the first 3-D “fishnet” metamaterial that can achieve a negative index of refraction at optical frequencies. Below is a scanning electron microscope image of the fabricated structure, developed by UC Berkeley researchers. The alternating layers form small circuits that can bend light backwards. (Jason Valentine/UC Berkeley)

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August 14, 2008 - Posted by | Educational & Teaching Resources, Nano News

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